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Are Your Work-From-Home Job Search Expectations Realistic?

In this blog, I’m going to share the results of our just-completed survey of work-from-home jobseekers, so that you can understand the realities of the search and hiring process, and perhaps adjust your approach with the tips we have distilled from this research. But first, let me explain why we conducted the survey. At Home Office Careers, we receive many positive communications from our members who find our 1,000+ validated and screened job offers to be a great resource in their efforts to secure real, honest work-from-home jobs. But we also receive many emails and calls from members who express disappointment that they have not yet landed a job and question, “what’s wrong?” So we conducted a survey among our members this month. Over 800 respondents completed the questionnaire, giving us a representative national sample of work-from-home jobseekers. That means that these findings are accurate to within a 95% level of confidence.   Here’s the topline: The survey finds that work-from-home jobseekers underestimate the time and effort required to obtain a home-based job. However, most are willing to adopt more realistic expectations of the time and proactive effort required, and recognize the value of professional help in finding screened, verified offers. Let’s look at these results in detail. First, jobseekers do not allow enough time to obtain a work-from-home job:   It Takes Longer Than You Think: More than half of those seeking work-from-home jobs–54%–believe it takes less than 4 months to obtain a job; 27% think it should take no more than 2 months.  Bu this does not agree with the reality and is refuted by a U.S. Bureau Of Labor Statistics report that it takes at least 3 to 4 months or more of searching before a job is landed. According to a Workopolis report, it will take an average of 16 weeks – 4 months –...

Podcast: Your Resume Is An Advertisement For You

We had recently posted a very informative article reminding our members that you should never under-estimate the power of an outstanding resume! Your resume is an advertisement of you and when written properly, it WILL get you a call-back and an interview with the company you’d like to work for! Now you can also listen to our Podcast, sharing this valuable information with you! Click PLAY to hear the audio recording. Let us know in the Comments section what questions we can answer to help you make your resume the best presentation of yourself!...

Your Resume Is An Advertisement For You

I’ve been helping people fulfill their working potential and achieve success throughout a long career in advertising. I’ve worked with thousands of people and with hundreds of different types of employers, and I’ve learned through experience how to coach and train all kinds of people in career management. And nothing gives me greater satisfaction than being here at Home Office Careers, helping people benefit from the growing trend among employers who are hiring more employees to work from home. So let’s get started with today’s subject:  What can advertising teach you about how to create a more effective resume? This will make sense once you realize that your resume is really an “advertisement for you.” Advertising is all about persuasive communications, so let’s treat your resume in that context, as an advertisement that would impress Madison Avenue, and that would be proud of. First, I want to make sure you understand the importance of having a good resume – because it’s something you will definitely need as a work from home job seeker. A resume is a summary of your relevant education and work experience and you should see it as a demonstration of your potential for work-from-home positions. You probably already know about resumes, or CVs as they are called internationally. Most online job applications will request that you attach your resume to the job application, or in some cases, they’ll instruct you to copy and paste the text of the resume directly into the application. Either way, your resume is being requested because it’s the single best way an employer can make an evaluation of you, the job applicant. Now, since the resume is going to help the employer learn about you to decide whether you are qualified for the job being offered, doesn’t it make sense to make sure that the resume is doing its absolute...

How To Ace The Virtual Interview

At Home Office Careers our members often ask, “Is there going to be an interview if I apply for a work from home job?” The answer is “yes, possibly.” If the applicant is a serious candidate for the job, an important step in the evaluation process may be the interview, because an employer wants to get to know the candidate, just as in a traditional, on-premises application process. But as we’ll discuss below, the interview of the home-based job seeker will almost always be a virtual interview, conducted electronically, with the participants being hundreds or even thousands of miles apart. While not every job you apply to and are considered for will involve an interview, I recommend you be prepared for the day an interview is scheduled. In fact, as a candidate for a work from home job, you should realize the importance employers place on trying to get to know you before making an offer. This is confirmed by research: We recently conducted a survey among the HR managers of organizations across the U.S., and one of our findings is that employers find it harder to recruit work from home employees compared to traditional employees: “Two-thirds (65.1%) of HR managers consider home-based workers more difficult to hire than on-premises employees; and this is especially so for full time job applicants.” You can read the full research report by clicking here. One of the key reasons for this is the inability or inconvenience of meeting the applicant in person. But that does not mean there is not going be an interview – quite the contrary, since the employer does want to “meet” you. Expect A Virtual Interview: But unlike a traditional interview, the work from home job applicant’s interview is likely to be a “virtual interview,” conducted remotely. You might live on the West Coast and the employer could...

More Successful Job Applications

This blog provides actionable recommendations for work from home job seekers, plus some advice for employers on how to improve the application process for applicants – and for themselves.   “My job applications are not being responded to.”   You are not alone. As we see more and more people being able to work from home – an observation that was strongly supported by the recent “2016 Survey of HR Managers” (more about that survey in a moment), we are also seeing increasing concerns from work from home job seekers whose applications have not been responded to by employers. It’s easy to understand the frustrations of the job seekers: They invest time, energy and even passion in completing each application with care, attaching a customized resume and then hitting that all-important “Submit” button. There may be an instant “Thank you” generated automatically when the application is submitted, but then, most of the time, nothing else happens. The application has disappeared into cyberspace, never to be heard from again. It is important to understand why job applications are frequently not acknowledged and what you, as a work from home job seeker, can do about it by becoming proactive.   This is not the way things used to be.   First, let’s understand why employers are not getting back to you. In a pre-digital world, job applications were submitted by mail, and common courtesies dictated that a member of the employer’s staff would send a polite acknowledgement, and an assurance that the application would receive the employer’s full attention. Then typically in the next step, if the applicant was not accepted, a brief letter of notification would follow, expressing regret and saying that the candidate’s resume would be kept on file for further openings. Of course, this is no longer how it works. Today’s employers are less responsive; maybe it’s the...

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